50 Savage Insults People Found Online That Were Too Good Not To Share With Everyone (New Pics)

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Susan Krauss Whitbourne, Ph.D., ABPP, a Professor Emerita of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, thinks the first step after you’re insulted is deciding on the nature of the insult and whether it is poking into a fundamental aspect of your identity. “Making fun of your shirt or hat is entirely different than having an insult directed at your body, your sexual history, or sexual orientation,” she wrote. “The insulter may not intend to be mean, but by tapping into your deepest layer of identity, it’s going to strike a nerve. Such direct aims at your personhood constitute harassment and may call for you to take action to call out the perpetrator especially if this is occurring in the workplace.”

“Opening the channels of communication instead of retreating into insecurity and anxiety about a possible insult will allow you to gain the data that will allow you to proceed accordingly. It would be nice if we lived in a world without either obvious or subtle insults, but since we don’t, you can at least gain insight into the feelings these provoke within you. Fulfillment may not always be within the realm of possibility in your relationships, but by handling these unpleasantries, you can improve your chances of achieving it.”

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